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Arizona basketball: Sean Miller explains the Wildcats' offensive rebounding inconsistencies

Apparently Arizona sometimes doesn't get offensive rebounds on purpose.

Casey Sapio-USA TODAY Sports

One number that hasn't exactly been consistent this season for the Arizona Wildcats has been offensive rebounding.

In the last eight games, Arizona has had anywhere from seven to 17 offensive boards in a game. And apparently that number depends on how the officials are calling that particular game.

"I'm now, as a coach, more aware of officiating," Sean Miller said on Tuesday. "I think sometimes in a game, it's not smart to offensive rebound because they're just going to call a foul."

It's an interesting take, and one that might not cross a lot of fans' minds when it comes to that aspect of the game.

"Sometimes, when you offensive rebound, they'll let the game go," coach continued. "We have to adjust. So for example, when we played Utah, two very good teams, two physical teams, it was a game that was played more like an NCAA Tournament."

Arizona had 17 offensive rebounds in that Utah game.

"We have to be aware of (officiating). Offensive rebounding right now for me as the coach, I'm not as concerned about that as maybe I once was because it can really backfire on us if fouls are called a certain way depending on how aggressive we were. Against Stanford would be a great example that we just send everybody back on every shot because it's going to be a foul."

Arizona had 7 offensive rebounds against Stanford, which was the very next game after Utah.

"Again, some games, I think you want to unleash your team to offensive rebound," coach reiterated. "But some games, it makes no sense. It's like a turnover because they're just going to call a foul. So we have to, as coaches, be smart with what is going to happen when the game begins. Are they going to allow you to run hard around a guy, or is that a foul? And once we determine that, we either say don't offensive rebound, or offensive rebound."

"When we get beyond the conference and into the NCAA, that stat will mean a lot more. The team that offensive rebounds is much more significant."

So, if Sean Miller isn't worried about his team's offensive rebounding numbers during Pac-12 play, maybe we shouldn't be either.