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Arizona basketball: Sean Miller praises NCAA’s handling of Allonzo Trier’s suspension, appeal

It was strange on the outside, but not so much on the inside

NCAA Basketball: Northwestern State at Arizona Casey Sapio-USA TODAY Sports

As each passing day went with no comment from the Arizona Wildcats on why Allonzo Trier wasn’t playing, you could sense the frustration growing among the fanbase.

You also had new rumors and conspiracies and everything else you could imagine on the internet start popping up, and for people that had a pretty good idea of what was actually happening, criticism of the NCAA became more prevalent as well.

But Sean Miller, who obviously knew everything that was going on, thinks that the NCAA actually did a really good job with the whole situation.

“The NCAA did the best that they could,” he explained on Monday. “They were extremely fair, and really had the student-athlete welfare at the forefront of a lot of things. It might not have felt that way to the outside, but they were very communicative, very direct, very cooperative, and trying to hold to the standards that they need to hold these type of issues to, but also being very fair and transparent at the same time.”

Miller’s positive thoughts on the situation likely stem from the fact that the NCAA heard the appeal, and reduced the initial sentence of one year based on the circumstances that surrounded the failed test.

“Our university, Dr. (Ann Weaver) Hart on down, Greg Byrne, everybody, we couldn’t ask for more cooperation,” Miller continued. “Again, having a student-athlete’s welfare at the forefront of their decisions, and putting incredible hours and time into this just to make sure that the process was done right and that what’s fair is fair.”

“The outcome came, and I’m looking forward to not looking back.”

With this whole thing now in the rearview mirror, all of the drama that has surrounded Arizona basketball is no longer there, and it’s all about basketball now.

What a refreshing thought.