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Arizona basketball: Former Wildcat Sidiki Johnson in prison for second degree attempted robbery and third degree robbery

Johnson, once a highly-touted recruit, played in just three games at Arizona before transferring to Providence

Arizona State v Arizona Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images

In 2011, Sidiki Johnson was a top-100 basketball recruit and signed with the Arizona Wildcats to help Sean Miller rebuild a storied program that had experienced a few years of instability.

There were high hopes for the New York forward, but his UA career ended in disappointment, to say the least.

Johnson appeared in just three games at the UA before being suspended indefinitely for violating team rules and eventually transferred out of the program, failing to complete a single semester at Arizona.

He transferred to Providence but appeared in just 13 games there before leaving the program for personal reasons.

Johnson never played Division I basketball after that, and evidently got himself into some serious legal trouble, according to NBC Sports:

Sidiki Johnson, is currently an inmate at Greene Penitentiary in Coxsackie, New York. He’s currently two years into a four-year sentence for second degree attempted robbery and third degree robbery.

The details came to light because Johnson’s brother, Texas signee Mohamed Bamba, has been accused of accepting improper benefits from Greer Love, the vice president at Huron Capital.

The accuser? Ibrahim Johnson, the brother of Bamba and Sidiki Johnson.

Ibrahim released a 22-minute video on Facebook outlining the alleged specifics. It’s a pretty wild story and you can read the whole thing at College Basketball Talk.

Interestingly enough, Arizona recruited Bamba, the No. 2 prospect in 2017, which now seems somewhat surprising knowing the family’s history with Miller and the UA.

Bamba, a 7-footer with a 7-foot-9 wingspan, is projected to be selected fourth overall in the 2018 NBA Draft.


Follow Ryan Kelapire on Twitter at @RKelapire